User Stories | User Stories & Epics

How to Write Epics and User Stories
Nov 16, 2018

Epics

As a product manager/owner while creating an epic include the following four things as the very basic structure.
Introduction
Product requirement
Technical requirement
Design requirement

Introduction
In short, your introduction can include:
summary of what the features you’re building are for and why you’re building them
what metrics you are trying to improve
links to specific documentation
marketing plans, legal requirements (if any)
early wireframes

Product requirement
An essential part of the epic where you provide with an explanation for the whole team working on it to understand what are they going to design, build, test or release. For example, if you are building a feature that the feature has to be fast or should be available in multiple languages, or should work on multiple devices like mobile, tablet and desktop should be mentioned in the product requirement section of your epic.

Design requirement
While writing the design requirement collaborate with your UX designer as much as you can. Take their input as there might be things that a designer thinks is important in order to have a better user experience which wouldn’t cross your mind. For example, a designer might think the preview should be of a certain size and the profile picture should always maintain certain resolution in order for a good experience than those kinds of requirement should be written here.

Technical requirement
Similar to the design requirement in this part of the epic try to involve the engineers or tech lead as much as possible. Their inputs in the early stage will be very useful while estimation and building it correctly. For example, the engineering team might want to build an API to integrate with some other system in order to fetch and maintain the quality of an image, those kinds of specifications and requirements should be mentioned under engineering requirements.

User Stories

User stories are basically the break down of an epic in a more user-focused way for the engineering team to understand the product requirement. In agile methodologies, everything that we build should be focused around users and hence the main purpose of the user story should be to shift the focus around a feature in a more human conversation manner.

Here is a simple template that is widely used while creating user stories:
As a (type of user), I want (some goal), so that (reason).

The point of the user story is to clearly state the feature desired from the point of view of the user.
A user story must have just the right level of detail. It should be a high-level requirement with additional detail added to the accustomed acceptance criteria.
The acceptance criteria are the clear picture for the engineering team to understand ‘what’ they are building and for the QA to clearly state the acceptance test.
The components to be included are:
User story
Acceptance Criteria
Design attached to the user story

Author = Bindiya Thakkar

URL = https://productcoalition.com/how-to-write-epics-and-user-stories-best-practice-1de5b983900

UX | Storyboards & Product Definition

Storyboards and How They Help in Product Definition
krasamo | Nov 23, 2020

Table of Content
Introduction to storyboards
What is a storyboard?
Who can use a storyboard?
Where can we use a storyboard?
When can we use a storyboard?
How do we create a storyboard?

Detailed User Stories: Detailed user stories consist of lengthy descriptions of a use case, with plenty of specifics and distinguishing information. These long user stories help design teams understand the environment and inputs that the user is subjected to while using the product. There are many questions that must be answered to develop a detailed user story. Following are just a few:

Who is the user?
What does the user need to do and why?
What is the user seeing?
What is the environment?
How does the user feel?
What is the journey through the product?
Short User Stories: Short user stories help determine what actions a user needs to perform. These stories consist of short sentences that answer three simple questions:

Who is performing the task?
What does the user need to do?
Why does the user need to accomplish this task?

For product managers, storyboards are beneficial for:

Defining a product
Visualizing different approaches to solving a specific problem
Identifying missing features or requirements
For marketing managers, storyboards are beneficial for:

Comparing experiences between competitors
Understanding the context and environment of a sale
Providing feedback about user research, user profiles, and personas
For technical leads and developers, storyboards can help identify aspects such as:

Response time a user is expecting for a specific process or input
Development constraints
Platform limitations
Technical needs
For UI/UX designers, storyboards are helpful for evaluating:

The overall experience of the case, time consumption, number of steps, etc.
The environment or context of the product’s usage
Platform and device standards
Possible side scenarios
Error prevention

Author = Montse Cordova (krasamo)

URL = https://www.krasamo.com/storyboards-and-how-they-help-in-product-definition/

How to Write a Good User Story: with Examples & Templates

What is a User Story? User Story is a small (actually, the smallest) piece of work that represents some value to an end user and can be delivered during a sprint.
As a [type of user], I want [an action] so that [a benefit/a value]

Great User Stories always fit the INVEST set of criteria by Bill Wake:

Independent – they can be developed in any sequence and changes to one User Story don’t affect the others.
Negotiable – it’s up for the team to decide how to implement them; there is no rigidly fixed workflow.
Valuable – each User Story delivers a detached unit of value to end users.
Estimable – it’s quite easy to guess how much time the development of a User Story will take.
Small – it should go through the whole cycle (designing, coding, testing) during one sprint.
Testable – there should be clear acceptance criteria to check whether a User Story is implemented appropriately.
Don’t forget to add an acceptance criteria = a set of conditions that are used to confirm when a Story is completed.

Is there something else? An Epic is a high-level body of work that bands together with a group of related Stories.

Article also covers:
What Are the Benefits of Creating User Stories?
How to Write User Stories: Our Workflow
Who is responsible for creating a User Story?
When are User Stories created?
What are the steps to write great Agile User Stories?
Step 1: Think of the “Who”
Step 2: Think of the “What”
Step 3: Think of the “Why”
Step 4: Discuss a Story
Conclusion

Author = Andrew Bondarenko (Stormotion)

https://stormotion.io/blog/how-to-write-a-good-user-story-with-examples-templates/

INVEST in Good Stories, and SMART Tasks

XP teams have to manage stories and tasks. The INVEST and SMART acronyms can remind teams of the good characteristics of each.

What are characteristics of a good story? The acronym “INVEST” can remind you that good stories are:
I – Independent
N – Negotiable
V – Valuable
E – Estimable
S – Small
T – Testable

There is an acronym for creating effective goals: “SMART
S – Specific
M – Measurable
A – Achievable
R – Relevant
T – Time-boxed

Author = Bill Wake (XP123)

https://xp123.com/articles/invest-in-good-stories-and-smart-tasks/

Summary of User Stories: The Three “C”s and INVEST

A User Story has three primary components, each of which begin with the letter ‘C’:
Card
As a [user role] of the product,
I can [action]
So that [benefit].

Conversation
The collaborative conversation facilitated by the Product Owner which involves all stakeholders and the team.
Confirmation
The Product Owner must confirm that the story is complete before it can be considered “done”. The team and the Product Owner check the “doneness” of each story in light of the Team’s current definition of “done”

The test for determining whether or not a story is well understood and ready for the team to begin working on it is the INVEST acronym:

I – Independent
N – Negotiable
V – Valuable
E – Estimable
S – Small
T – Testable

Article concludes with tips on Splitting User Stories & Personas.

Author = Travis Birch (Berteig)

https://www.berteig.com/how-to-apply-agile/summary-of-user-stories-the-three-cs-and-invest/