The Scrum Guide Reordered

The Scrum Guide Reordered is based on about 90 percent of the text of the 2017 Scrum Guide, extending its original structure by adding additional categories. For example, you will find all quotes that can be attributed to the role of the Scrum Master in one place. While the Scrum Guide is mainly focused on the three roles, five events, and three artifacts, I aggregated quotes on specific topics as well, for example, on self-organization, finance or technical debt.

The Scrum Guide–Reordered allows you to get a first understanding of Scrum-related questions quickly. For example, it is good at relating a specific topis — say “stakeholder” — with Scrum first principles such as Scrum Values, or empiricism.

Note: Need to sign up to obtain the Free PDF

Author = Stefan Wolpers

https://age-of-product.com/scrum-guide-reordered/

The Rise Of Zombie Scrum: Symptoms, causes and what you can do about it

Zombies: (…) they are here, and their number is growing rapidly. Mindless, drooling herds of developers, testers, designers and others moaning ‘chaaaange’ and shambling around the building to all sorts of brainless Scrum-activities.

Symptoms of Zombie Scrum
Symptom #1: No beating heart
Symptom #2: No (desire for) contact with the outside world
Symptom #3: No emotional response to success or failure
Symptom #4: No drive to improve

Causes of Zombie Scrum
Cause #1: A bit too homegrown, or ‘Cargo Cult Scrum’
Cause #2: No urgency
Cause #3: Competing Values

Treating Zombie Scrum
Treatment #1: Become a Zombie-whisperer
Treatment #2: Introduce Healthy Scrum into the population
Treatment #3: Shake things up (don’t continue the stumble)
Treatment #4: Involve the broader Scrum Community

Author = Christiaan Verwijs

https://medium.com/the-liberators/the-rise-of-zombie-scrum-cd98741015d5

Introducing the Zombie Scrum Symptom Checker

Is your team suffering from Zombie Scrum? And if so, what can you do to improve? Do you wonder how other teams work with Scrum? How many members they have? What the usual length of a Sprint is? Is Scrum really helping teams deliver value to stakeholders faster and making them happier as a result? Find out with the first version of the Free Zombie Scrum Symptoms Checker.

The mission of our app “Our mission with this app is to use an empirical approach to better understand how teams and organizations work with Scrum, what it makes possible for them, what enables or impedes their success and how to better support them.“

Other content:
Based on a scientific approach
Receive your team’s profile
Open-source data and replication
Next steps for our research
Give it a try!

Author = Christiaan Verwijs (Scrum.org)

https://www.scrum.org/resources/blog/introducing-zombie-scrum-symptom-checker

Fight Zombie Scrum!
Link to the Free Online Tool to Diagnose your team

Author = The Liberators

https://survey.zombiescrum.org

Measure Cycle Time, Not Velocity

I’m not a fan of measuring velocity. Velocity is a point-in-time measure of capacity. That means that when things change for the team or in the code, the velocity often changes. (See Velocity is Not Acceleration.)

Instead, I like to measure cycle time. Cycle time is the entire time it takes a team to finish something on their board.

Cycle time indicates how much the team collaborates together and how small the stories are. We want more collaboration and smaller stories in any agile approach. That’s why measuring cycle time creates a virtuous (positive) feedback loop.

Here’s how to measure cycle time: I like to use a value stream map to see the wait times and work times.
Note every time the work changes state: is it a work time (above the line) or a wait time (below the line)
Add all the work times together.
Add all the wait times together.
Cycle time is all the work time plus all the wait time.

Other content:
Map the Value Stream for a Collaborative Team
Map the Value Stream for a Team Where People Work as Individuals
Use Cycle Time to Estimate Story Duration

Author = Johanna (Rothman Consulting Group, Inc.)

https://www.jrothman.com/mpd/2019/09/measure-cycle-time-not-velocity/

Differences between TDD, ATDD and BDD

They are not the same. Article covers:

TDD = Test-driven development = a technique of using automated unit tests to drive the design of software and force decoupling of dependencies.

ATDD = Acceptance Test Driven Development,
aka STDD = Storytest Driven Development = a technique used to bring customers into the test design process before coding has begun. It is a collaborative practice where users, testers, and developers define automated acceptance criteria.

BDD = Behavior-Driven Development = combines the general techniques and principles of TDD with ideas from domain-driven design. BDD is a design activity where you build pieces of functionality incrementally guided by the expected behavior.

Article also discusses Differences.

Author = Gabo Esquivel

https://gaboesquivel.com/blog/2014/differences-between-tdd-atdd-and-bdd/

Force Field Analysis: The Ultimate How-to Guide

What are Driving Forces?
Driving forces push to influence a situation in particular direction. Driving forces work to support a stated goal or objective. They are usually seen as ‘positive’ forces that facilitate change.

What are Restraining Forces?
Restraining forces work to block or counter progress towards a goal or objective. They tend to limit or decrease the Driving forces.

Changing the Equilibrium
As a change management tool, Lewin’s Force Field Analysis is used to evaluate the forces FOR (Driving forces) and AGAINST (Restraining forces) a change. Before they are evaluated, though, they need to be identified. This can be done through these types of analyses:
SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats)
PRIMO-F (People, Resources, Innovation, Marketing, Operations, Finance)
PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social, Technology, Legal, Environmental)

For change to be successful (i.e. shifting the equilibrium to a new desired state), you need to:
Strengthen the Driving forces
Weaken the Restraining forces
Or do both


Why use Force Field Analysis?
A key benefit of Force Field Analysis is that it is really useful to help us understand:
how to move people through change
why people resist change
how we can analyze the pressures ‘for’ and ‘against’ change (the pros and cons)
how we can apply a better decision-making technique
how we can communicate go/no-go decisions

Case Study: 5 Steps to Fast and Dramatic Change using Force Field Analysis

How you can do a Force-Field Analysis?
Step 1. Describe your change
Step 2. Identify the forces ‘for’ change
Step 3. Identify the forces ‘against’ change
Step 4. Rate the remaining items
Step 5. Implement the plan!

Author = Daniel Lock

https://daniellock.com/force-field-analysis/

ScrumAlliance: Scrum Foundations eLearning Series

Scrum Theory and Values—Scrum Theory (05:47), Scrum Values (3:16)
Scrum Roles—Cross Functional and Self-Organizing Teams (1:42), Scrum Roles (2:39)
Scrum Events—Introduction to Scrum Events (3:34), Sprint Planning Meeting (7:35), Daily Scrum (3:40), Sprint Review (2:35), Sprint Retrospective (2:25)
Scrum Artifacts—Scrum Artifacts (3:48), Product Backlog (2:20), Product Backlog Refinement (2:16), Sprint Backlog (2:33), The Increment and Definition of Done (01:58)

Author = ScrumAlliance

https://www.scrumalliance.org/learn-about-scrum/scrum-elearning-series