Transitioning Teams as a Manager

The manager should try to minimize that uncertainty for the team. Still, it’s natural for people to evaluate whether they still want to be on the team. Why?

Change is Scary
Continuity
Consistent Message
Build Relationships

Conclusion: Remember that this is a natural time for team members to re-evaluate whether they still want to be on this team. Minimizing change and building trust quickly will help, but it may also make sense to allow mentally for some neutral attrition during this period.

Author = Chase Seibert (Dropbox)

https://chase-seibert.github.io/blog/2019/09/03/transistioning-teams-as-a-manager.html

Key Findings from Cloud Leaders: Why a Cloud Center of Excellence Matters

AWS recommends a cloud center of excellence (CCoE) to address the added complexity. And as the report shows, IT and business operations leaders recognize the power of this best practice – even if they haven’t yet applied it.

“A Cloud Center of Excellence (CCoE) is a cross-functional team of people responsible for developing and managing the cloud strategy, governance, and best practices that the rest of the organization can leverage to transform the business using the cloud. The CCoE leads the organization as a whole in cloud adoption, migration, and operations. It may also be called a Cloud Competency Center, Cloud Capability
Center, or Cloud Knowledge Center. “ — Cloud Management Report 2017

Three key themes emerged from the report:

  1. The full potential of the cloud has not yet been realized
  2. Organizations adopting a CCoE for cloud leadership and vision
  3. Organizations benefit from a CCoE

Author = AWS Public Sector Blog Team

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/publicsector/key-findings-from-cloud-leaders-why-a-cloud-center-of-excellence-matters/

Scrum Master Engagement Patterns: The Development Team

Last year, I ran a (non-representative) survey on how Scrum Masters are allocating their time when working with a single Scrum Team. Much to the surprise of many readers, the direct Scrum Master engagement with a single Scrum Team of average size and a typical 2-week Sprint turned out to be about 12 hours per week.

This result immediately prompted two additional questions: What are Scrum Masters doing during the rest of the week, and in what way does a Scrum Master’s work manifest itself over time? While answering the above question requires additional research and data collection, the latter can be answered to a certain grade by focusing on a few common scenarios.

The first article of this series will address the Scrum Master engagement with the Development Team.

Other content:
The Scrum Master Responsibilities According to the Scrum Guide
Scrum Master Engagement with the Development Team

(…) three main scenarios for the Scrum Master’s support of the team:
The Co-located, Stable Scrum Team Scenario
The Distributed Scrum Team Scenario
The Remote, Outsourced Scrum Team Scenario

Scrum Master Engagement Pattern—Conclusion

Author = Stefan Wolpers

https://age-of-product.com/scrum-master-engagement-patterns/

The Rise Of Zombie Scrum: Symptoms, causes and what you can do about it

Zombies: (…) they are here, and their number is growing rapidly. Mindless, drooling herds of developers, testers, designers and others moaning ‘chaaaange’ and shambling around the building to all sorts of brainless Scrum-activities.

Symptoms of Zombie Scrum
Symptom #1: No beating heart
Symptom #2: No (desire for) contact with the outside world
Symptom #3: No emotional response to success or failure
Symptom #4: No drive to improve

Causes of Zombie Scrum
Cause #1: A bit too homegrown, or ‘Cargo Cult Scrum’
Cause #2: No urgency
Cause #3: Competing Values

Treating Zombie Scrum
Treatment #1: Become a Zombie-whisperer
Treatment #2: Introduce Healthy Scrum into the population
Treatment #3: Shake things up (don’t continue the stumble)
Treatment #4: Involve the broader Scrum Community

Author = Christiaan Verwijs

https://medium.com/the-liberators/the-rise-of-zombie-scrum-cd98741015d5

Introducing the Zombie Scrum Symptom Checker

Is your team suffering from Zombie Scrum? And if so, what can you do to improve? Do you wonder how other teams work with Scrum? How many members they have? What the usual length of a Sprint is? Is Scrum really helping teams deliver value to stakeholders faster and making them happier as a result? Find out with the first version of the Free Zombie Scrum Symptoms Checker.

The mission of our app “Our mission with this app is to use an empirical approach to better understand how teams and organizations work with Scrum, what it makes possible for them, what enables or impedes their success and how to better support them.“

Other content:
Based on a scientific approach
Receive your team’s profile
Open-source data and replication
Next steps for our research
Give it a try!

Author = Christiaan Verwijs (Scrum.org)

https://www.scrum.org/resources/blog/introducing-zombie-scrum-symptom-checker

Fight Zombie Scrum!
Link to the Free Online Tool to Diagnose your team

Author = The Liberators

https://survey.zombiescrum.org

Measure Cycle Time, Not Velocity

I’m not a fan of measuring velocity. Velocity is a point-in-time measure of capacity. That means that when things change for the team or in the code, the velocity often changes. (See Velocity is Not Acceleration.)

Instead, I like to measure cycle time. Cycle time is the entire time it takes a team to finish something on their board.

Cycle time indicates how much the team collaborates together and how small the stories are. We want more collaboration and smaller stories in any agile approach. That’s why measuring cycle time creates a virtuous (positive) feedback loop.

Here’s how to measure cycle time: I like to use a value stream map to see the wait times and work times.
Note every time the work changes state: is it a work time (above the line) or a wait time (below the line)
Add all the work times together.
Add all the wait times together.
Cycle time is all the work time plus all the wait time.

Other content:
Map the Value Stream for a Collaborative Team
Map the Value Stream for a Team Where People Work as Individuals
Use Cycle Time to Estimate Story Duration

Author = Johanna (Rothman Consulting Group, Inc.)

https://www.jrothman.com/mpd/2019/09/measure-cycle-time-not-velocity/

What Is Sprint Review Meeting and How To Hold Absolutely Interesting One

Sprint Review Meeting
The Sprint review meeting should include the following:

Attendance and participation of the Scrum Team, product owner, and invited key stakeholders.
The Product Owner should report the items in the Product Backlog; what backlog items have been done and what have not.
The development team discusses what went well and the problems they experienced. They should also inform the group what they did to resolve the problems.
The development team demonstrates their completed work while answering questions about their increment.
The product owner leads the discussion on the Product Backlog as it currently stands. They set projected completion dates based on the progress of the Sprint session.
To give valuable input to the Sprint planning, the entire group establishes the next steps during the Sprint review meeting.
This is a time to review potential changes in the marketplace, the valuation of the project and what areas are considering to be the most valuable. The next steps should also be outlined.
Review the timeline, budget, potential capabilities, and marketplace to determine the next anticipated product release.
By the end of the Sprint Review, revisions should be made to the Product Backlog to better define probable backlog items for the next Sprint session. The Product Backlog can be adjusted completely to introduce new opportunities.

Focus on the End User
Involve the Product Owner
Understand Group Dynamics
Product Owner
Scrum Team
Company Executives/Stakeholders
End Users/Customers/Partners
Scrum Master

Be Courageous

Author = Luís Gonçalves

https://luis-goncalves.com/sprint-review-meeting/

How to Manage Modern Software Projects: Waterfall vs. Agile

Always interesting to read a pro/con analysis between Waterfall & Agile methodologies.

Waterfall Pros

It is easy to understand and manage as stages are clearly defined.
Meticulous record keeping and documentation.
Client knows what to expect. Client will have an idea of the size, cost and timeline for the project. The client will have a definite idea of what their product will do in the end.
In the case of employee turnover, waterfall’s strong documentation allows for minimal project impact

Waterfall Cons
It often becomes rigid and resistant to change.
It relies heavily on initial requirements. However if these requirements are faulty in any manner, the project is doomed.
The whole product is only tested at the end. If errors are discovered late in the process, their existence may have affected the rest of the project.
The plan does not take into account a client’s evolving needs throughout the project cycle.

Agile Pros
It allows for changes to be made after the initial planning stage. It follows client’s requirements changes.
It is easier to add features that will keep the product up to date with the latest developments in the industry.
At the end of each sprint, project priorities are evaluated. This allows clients to add their feedback, so that they ultimately get the product they desire.
The testing at the end of each sprint ensures that the errors are caught in each cycle.

Agile Cons
This dynamic methodology is not suitable for processes that require a complex decision making of formal planning such as construction, manufacturing, military, health care system among others.
As the initial project does not have a definitive plan, the final product can be grossly different that what was initially intended.

Author = Liz Parody (Moove-it, via Medium)

https://medium.com/@lizparody/waterfall-vs-agile-methodology-in-software-development-1e19ef168cf6