Definition of Done vs Acceptance Criteria

DoD = Definition of Done  = a list of requirements that a user story must adhere to for the team to call it complete.

Acceptance Criteria of a User Story = set of Test Scenarios that are to be met to confirm that the software is working as expected.

Article covers:

Definition of Done
The goals of Definition of Done
Example – Definition of Done
Acceptance Criteria
The goals of Acceptance Criteria
Example – Acceptance Criteria
Example of User Story with Acceptance Criteria

Author = Visual Paradigm

https://www.visual-paradigm.com/scrum/definition-of-done-vs-acceptance-criteria/

How to Write a Good User Story: with Examples & Templates

What is a User Story? User Story is a small (actually, the smallest) piece of work that represents some value to an end user and can be delivered during a sprint.
As a [type of user], I want [an action] so that [a benefit/a value]

Great User Stories always fit the INVEST set of criteria by Bill Wake:

Independent – they can be developed in any sequence and changes to one User Story don’t affect the others.
Negotiable – it’s up for the team to decide how to implement them; there is no rigidly fixed workflow.
Valuable – each User Story delivers a detached unit of value to end users.
Estimable – it’s quite easy to guess how much time the development of a User Story will take.
Small – it should go through the whole cycle (designing, coding, testing) during one sprint.
Testable – there should be clear acceptance criteria to check whether a User Story is implemented appropriately.
Don’t forget to add an acceptance criteria = a set of conditions that are used to confirm when a Story is completed.

Is there something else? An Epic is a high-level body of work that bands together with a group of related Stories.

Article also covers:
What Are the Benefits of Creating User Stories?
How to Write User Stories: Our Workflow
Who is responsible for creating a User Story?
When are User Stories created?
What are the steps to write great Agile User Stories?
Step 1: Think of the “Who”
Step 2: Think of the “What”
Step 3: Think of the “Why”
Step 4: Discuss a Story
Conclusion

Author = Andrew Bondarenko (Stormotion)

https://stormotion.io/blog/how-to-write-a-good-user-story-with-examples-templates/

INVEST in Good Stories, and SMART Tasks

XP teams have to manage stories and tasks. The INVEST and SMART acronyms can remind teams of the good characteristics of each.

What are characteristics of a good story? The acronym “INVEST” can remind you that good stories are:
I – Independent
N – Negotiable
V – Valuable
E – Estimable
S – Small
T – Testable

There is an acronym for creating effective goals: “SMART
S – Specific
M – Measurable
A – Achievable
R – Relevant
T – Time-boxed

Author = Bill Wake (XP123)

https://xp123.com/articles/invest-in-good-stories-and-smart-tasks/

Summary of User Stories: The Three “C”s and INVEST

A User Story has three primary components, each of which begin with the letter ‘C’:
Card
As a [user role] of the product,
I can [action]
So that [benefit].

Conversation
The collaborative conversation facilitated by the Product Owner which involves all stakeholders and the team.
Confirmation
The Product Owner must confirm that the story is complete before it can be considered “done”. The team and the Product Owner check the “doneness” of each story in light of the Team’s current definition of “done”

The test for determining whether or not a story is well understood and ready for the team to begin working on it is the INVEST acronym:

I – Independent
N – Negotiable
V – Valuable
E – Estimable
S – Small
T – Testable

Article concludes with tips on Splitting User Stories & Personas.

Author = Travis Birch (Berteig)

https://www.berteig.com/how-to-apply-agile/summary-of-user-stories-the-three-cs-and-invest/

A Day in the Life of a Scrum Master

A great Scrum Master…

  • Ensures the entire team supports the chosen Scrum process;
  • Manages the impediments that exceed the self-organizing capabilities of the team and it prevents them in achieving the Sprint Goal;
  • Recognizes healthy team conflict and promotes constructive disagreement;
  • Is prepared to be disruptive enough to enforce a change within the organization;
  • Understands the power of a self-organization;
  • Understands the value of a steady sprint rhythm and does everything to create and maintain it;
  • Knows how to truly listen and is comfortable with silence;
  • Understands the strength of coaching and has learned some powerful questions by heart;
  • Teaches the Product Owner how to maximize ROI and meet objectives;
  • Is also competent with XP, Kanban and Lean.

A day in the life of a Scrum Master:

  • Start the day with an open and curious mind (and in my case some good coffee)
  • A good first question to consider is “How can I improve the live of the Scrum Team by facilitating creativity and empowerment?”
  • Remember: your agenda is as good as empty! Except for the Daily Scrum and maybe some other Scrum events
  • You attend the Daily Scrum as an observer. You listen to what is and isn’t being said.
  • You consider some of the questions I’ve mentioned earlier.
  • Based on your observations you determine your next steps. This might be coaching, consulting, teaching, facilitating, mentoring, managing, problem solving, conflict navigating or… just sitting with the team, listening and watching the team.
  • Doing “nothing” is a perfect activity for a Scrum Master! The biggest pitfall for a Scrum Master is being too busy and not noticing what is really going on.

Author = Barry Overeem

http://www.barryovereem.com/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-scrum-master/

What makes a good Scrum Master?

Here is what the Scrum Master is NOT:

  • Scrum Master is NOT a project manager
  • Scrum Master is NOT the boss
  • Scrum Master is NOT responsible for talking to stakeholders
  • Scrum Master is NOT the head that rolls in case of project failure
  • Scrum Master is NOT the person calling everyone to the scrum meetings

Here are 8 things that will benefit a good Scrum Master:

  1. Lots of experience! (Has done Scrum projects in the past)
  2. At ease with being inconvenient, annoying and a pita
  3. Ability to watch and listen
  4. No superior
  5. Servant leadership
  6. Empathy
  7. Communicative
  8. No fear (of superiors or being fired)

Author = Matthias Orgler (Hackernoon)

https://hackernoon.com/what-makes-a-good-scrum-master-fba685120534