8 tips for better agile retrospective meetings

Here’s how to get more positive results from your retro meetings, and build a stronger team while you’re at it.

What’s a retro supposed to look like?
When retros implode

8 tips for better retrospectives

  1. Amplify the good! Instead of focusing on what didn’t work well, why not begin the retro by having everyone mention one positive item first?
  2. Don’t jump to a solution. Thinking about a problem deeply instead of trying to solve it right away might be a better option.
  3. If the retrospective doesn’t make you feel excited about an experiment, maybe you shouldn’t try it in the next iteration.
  4. If you’re not analyzing how to improve, (5 Whys, force-field analysis, impact mapping, or fish-boning), you might be jumping to solutions too quickly.
  5. Vary your methods. If every time you do a retrospective you ask, “What worked, what didn’t work?” and then vote on the top item from either column, your team will quickly get bored. Retromat is a great free retrospective tool to help vary your methods.
  6. End each retrospective by asking for feedback on the retro itself. This might seem a bit meta, but it works: Continually improving the retrospective is recursively improving as a team.
  7. Remove the impediments. Ask how you are enabling the team’s search for improvement, and be prepared to act on any feedback.
  8. There are no “iteration police.” Take breaks as needed. Deriving hypotheses from analysis and coming up with experiments involves creativity, and it can be taxing. Every once in a while, go out as a team and enjoy a nice retrospective lunch.

Author = Catherine Louis

https://opensource.com/article/18/3/tips-better-agile-retrospective-meetings

Retromat

Retromat is a great free retrospective tool to help vary your methods.

https://retromat.org/en/

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